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Articles Posted in ACS

Law is an ever dynamic and changing field, which responds to evolutions in our society and the way we live. When changes occur to laws which may influence my clients, I attempt to offer an overview in the form of these blogs and articles, to assist in developing a deeper understanding.

Recently, changes occurred within the standards used to “indicate” a case in Social Services law. These changes were introduced within “Part R” of chapter 56 of the laws of 2020 – sometimes referred to as the “SCR reform legislation”. Among other alterations, the new law changes the standard of evidence which must be implemented when determining whether to indicate a report of child abuse or maltreatment.

The new standard adapts the rule from providing “some credible evidence” to providing “a fair preponderance” for evidence. Let’s take a closer look at the changes. Continue reading ›

Lawyeratdesk-300x200In this blog we’re going to be talking about the administrative process that occurs when someone challenges an indicated finding of neglect or abuse.

If there is a complaint made to Child Protective Services (the agency responsible if it is on Long Island or outside of New York City) or the Administration of Children’s Services (the agency responsible for New York City), a process begins. The agency has 60 days to either indicate the case (aka determine that the case is founded) or decide that the case is unfounded (aka not indicated).

There is a low standard applied in the initial indicated determination of “some credible evidence” in order to decide whether to indicate the case or not. Because of this low initial standard, some cases that are relatively minor or there is weak evidence get indicated initially despite the low amount of evidence of neglect. Continue reading ›

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